Historic Churches of Monroe, WA

Monroe has a number of historic churches that still stand today. Let’s start with Monroe United Methodist Church, pictured above. This brick beauty was the city’s first church, organized in 1896, with the current building being built in 1924. Here’s a postcard featuring the church from the 1950’s.

monroe methodist episcopal churchThe Monroe Congregational Church is just down Lewis Street, First Congregational Church of Monroeand it was the 5th church to be built in Monroe, in 1907. From the churches archives, “in 1907 the church lots cost $470.00 and the erection of the building $3,000.00.” The stained glass windows in this church are beautiful even to passersby on the outside, and breathtaking inside! I was unable to find any information about when these windows were installed, but they appear to reflect the local setting of Monroe, tucked in at the foot of the mountains, with the valley spreading out wide on the other side. The windows are done in twi-panel style, with the center panel of each being the largest. This is a popular design style for religious art.Stained Glass from First Congregational Church of Monroe

 

Stained Glass from First Congregational Church of Monroe

I have been in the field of Early Childhood Education since 1995. I have my Bachelor’s degree in Professional Child Development. In my free time, I love LEGO, ballet, ballroom dancing, eating out, traveling, history, architecture, genealogy, and people.

Discovering the Truth

I found this little gem in the Monroe library (part of the Sno-Isle library system of Snohomish & Island Counties in Washington state) the other day and thought it was such a great idea! The 4th grade class of John Luvera from Coupeville, WA  (under the guidance of their student teacher, Rachel Smith) found interesting local elders, listened to their stories, and wrote a little biography on them. They published the book to give to the library’s local history collection so these stories could be preserved for future generations. Unfortunately, it is labeled as a reference book, so you can only view it at the Monroe library. If you are interested, here are the elders who were featured:

Bob Podraza, Jean Paul Combettes, Marjorie Thornton, Virginia Herdesty, Ellen Schell, Ryan Samplawski, Gale Sims, Betty Strickland, Tom Thorton, Irene Moisin, and Peggy Gleason.

And if you happen to be planning a trip to the Monroe library, be sure to bring your young children because they have an absolutely wonderful, brand new play space designed for families, filled with toys to enhance literacy development. As an added bonus, children are never required to use a whisper voice in the library…if you want a quiet space, you can go to a quiet room.

Library play area

I have been in the field of Early Childhood Education since 1995. I have my Bachelor’s degree in Professional Child Development. In my free time, I love LEGO, ballet, ballroom dancing, eating out, traveling, history, architecture, genealogy, and people.