Skillet Street Food – Seattle, WA

Food: Hattie
Food: Parents
Kid Friendliness
Summary

Restaurant: Skillet Street Food
Cuisine: American/Burgers
Visit Date: January 8th, 2016
Location: Seattle, WA
Address: 305 Harrison Street (inside Seattle Center Armory)
Price of Kids Meal: $6 – $7 (no drink)
Child Friendliness Factors: 
-Changing Table in restroom: Yes.
-Child hand washing made convenient: No, but a definite yes for the Children’s Museum restrooms downstairs
-Highchairs available: Yes, and they had children’s chairs/tables too!
-Drinks: Lidded cups w/ straws available, but no milk.
-Child-friendly food/servings on menu: Yes, but the portions were a bit large.
-Welcoming touches for children: Nothing special, but the museum downstairs is great!
Additional Comments:
-Wine & beer available
-Located inside the Armory food court area
-Outdoor patio available on warm days
-No table service/counter service only

Skillet Street Food Grilled Cheese

This is one of the brick-and-mortar versions of the (locally) famous silver food truck, located inside the Seattle Center Armory. It’s the perfect spot to eat dinner after playing hard at the Children’s Museum downstairs, or enjoying your favorite festival at Seattle Center (I personally enjoy BrickCon most). The food is always yummy, and they have food that kids like me really enjoy, like waffles or grilled cheese. The only thing missing from their kids menu were any sort of vegetables, but I suppose that can be forgiven.

Skillet Street Food Kids Menu

My mom ordered the cornmeal waffle for me & the grilled cheese for herself. The waffle didn’t taste anything like cornmeal. The whipped cream was obviously freshly made, and they put strawberries, blackberries, and apple slices on top. It was soooo delicious that I couldn’t even save room to try mom’s grilled cheese!

When I'm bigger, I'll get to use the kid chairs & table.
When I’m bigger, I’ll get to use the kid chairs & table.

I was born in September of 2014, and ever since I started eating solid foods I have been a self-proclaimed foodie. I am also an aspiring chef (actually, I just aspire to reach the kitchen counter right now), and experienced restaurant critic.

Compass Cafe – Seattle, WA

Food: Hattie
Food: Parents
Kid Friendliness
Summary

Restaurant: Compass Cafe
Cuisine: American/Sandwiches/Deli
Visit Date: December 31st, 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Address: 860 Terry Ave N (inside MOHAI)
Price of Kids Meal: $8.95 (actually, this was the price of the bowl of Mac & Cheese I stole from my mom. Not sure what the actual “kids meal” costs.)
Child Friendliness Factors: 
-Changing Table in restroom: Not in the restroom closest to the cafe, but in the museum restrooms.
-Child hand washing made convenient: No. All they have is those Dyson AirBlade dryers which don’t  work on tiny hands and are kinda scary.
-Highchairs available: Multiple, and they were clean & in good repair.
-Lidded cups & straws available: Straws, but no lids.
-Child-friendly food/servings on menu: Yes, everything was a la carte, which is perfect for tiny tummies, and you could see everything through the glass, which makes it easy for picky eaters to find something that looks good to them.
-Welcoming touches for children: Nothing special, but the attached museum is crazy-friendly for kids!
Additional Comments:
-Wine & beer available
-Espresso machine
-Don’t have to be a museum visitor to eat here
-Outdoor patio available on warm days
-No table service/counter service only

Compass Cafe

On a recent trip to the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI) I got hungry, so we took a break to eat at their cafe, which was surprisingly tasty. I would actually eat here even if I wasn’t visiting the museum.  I ordered the Asian Vermicelli, which turned out to be too salty for my taste, but my parents ate it in like 3 seconds, so I guess they like salt more than I do. I ended up eating my mom’s Radiatore and Cheese which was so super yummy. Radiatore is a noodle shape that is very easy for little fingers to pick up, and the cheese sauce was made with Beecher’s Flagship & Tilamook Cheddar, which might be my 2 favorite cheeses in the universe.

I was born in September of 2014, and ever since I started eating solid foods I have been a self-proclaimed foodie. I am also an aspiring chef (actually, I just aspire to reach the kitchen counter right now), and experienced restaurant critic.

In 1889, the city of Seattle burned to the ground. When they rebuilt, they decided to take advantage of the situation and move the “street level” up one floor. The result was a basement level in the downtown area of the city, complete with sidewalks! To allow light into these underground areas, the street level sidewalks were imbedded with glass chunks, tapered at one end to maximize light transfer. Brilliant! They’re called prism lights, and Seattle is not the only city to put them to use. I hear that the purple color is a result of the aging for the manganese that was added to the glass as a stabilizer. These prism lights also look amazing when the “sidewalk vault” underneath is lit at night, so the purple glass glows.

Seattle sidewalk street view

I found this fun 1880’s flyer online about the Brown Brothers Manufacturing Company, which may well have been the producers of the prism lights, but if they were, that means they were shipped all the way from Chicago! Perhaps they were made by one of the other prism glass companies I found listed here.

Wherever they came from, these beautiful and ingenious panels are a treasured part of Seattle’s personality, and an interesting part of its history.

I have been in the field of Early Childhood Education since 1995. I have my Bachelor’s degree in Professional Child Development. In my free time, I love LEGO, ballet, ballroom dancing, eating out, traveling, history, architecture, genealogy, and people.